Tea and Elephants

ElephantsSizedcrop1quote

openersized

Hello! So glad you could pop by.  I’ve set our tea things in the foyer, and I’ve already poured everyone a cup.  So, come on in and find a comfy chair.  Is the weather dismal where you’re at or unseasonably warm?  It’s been crazy this year, hasn’t it?

RowSized

I don’t really believe the quote above, but it does sometimes seem plausible, especially if uttered from the back of an elephant — think the Carthaginian general, Hannibal.  Whether excited over a success or depressed regarding a bad experience, tea seems to help.  The phrase, “Let’s have a cup of tea,” can add to an impromptu celebratory gathering amongst friends, or bring a small dose of comfort when soothing a companion.   Teatime is also the perfect opportunity to share a few secrets.

teaSecretsSized

My husband and I had been married at least ten years when, over a cup of tea, I casually mentioned that I had ridden elephants.  At the time, it seemed an appropriate comment given the direction of our conversation.  He almost spewed a mouthful of hot liquid all over the table.  I didn’t realize most people hadn’t had the opportunity to ride one of the enormous creatures.  When I revealed that I’d been on camels too, well, he nearly fell over!

cupSized

Money was tight growing up. My parents, children of the Great Depression, believed in living frugally.  That being said, my mother was prescient enough to splurge when a golden opportunity arose, and I’m grateful for her wisdom.

setSized

bordersized

elephants3sized1quote

bordersized

I could only have been about two or three years old when I first encountered an elephant up close and personal.  In the parking lot of a local grocery store, a man showed one off, along with a camel.  It goes without saying that government regulations then weren’t what they are now.   I don’t know what Mom paid, but I paired up with a young boy and rode the elephant, fed peanuts to the animal, and petted his trunk.  I will never forget the experience, especially what it felt like to move with the beast and have the pachyderm’s hose-like snout gently caress my hand and carefully remove the nuts.  He wasn’t threatening in the least, in spite of his size.

flowerSized

Not long afterwards, it was my mum who informed me of the emotional nature of these magnificent creatures. When she was a child in Montreal, it seems a jealous one stomped a woman to death during a parade when its trainer stopped and paid a lady in the crowd too much attention — gruesome, I know, but true.

opener1sized

Years later, after other fortunate meetings with more elephants, I attended Circus Vargas with a date. This wasn’t my first trip to the big top, either.  The man I went with insisted we ride on the elephant available for short forays around the grounds.  I wasn’t so excited about the prospect.  The animal was enormous — we had to climb atop a platform and walk a rickety plank to get on its back — and frankly, grumpy looking.  I think the fellow (my date) just wanted the chance to get up close and personal with me.  Everything turned out fine in the end.  We had a pleasant trip around the lot, and we broke up a short time later!

portraitSized

When I recently read that Ringling Brothers was closing its tent, I felt terrible. I know there are those who dislike circuses, and I can respect their position.  Over the years, I’ve been to all kinds of these performances, ranging from the most famous operations to small boutique outfits.  I also will never forget when we took our own children to see Ringling Brothers.  My oldest, then about five, turned to me at intermission after confetti cannons had gone off raining thousands of bright paper strips down on the audience and said, “It’s just like a dream!”  He seemed in a wonderful, happy daze as he experienced the unique magic of a circus for the first time.

kathsized

bookborder

Since then, I’ve since discovered many interesting facts and theories regarding elephants, who continue to hold a soft spot in my heart. Some of these are incorporated into my new book, The Pernicious Pachyderm, available now as a pre-order on Amazon (to be released March 25th).  The story also features a small circus.  I cannot believe this is the seventh novel in the Duncan Dewar series.  If you think you might enjoy reading about this unusual case, please click on the cover image below.

coverPerniciousSmallest

bookborder

How are you enjoying your tea?  Today, I chose to brew a simple, naturally decaffeinated blend, Red Rose.  Three bags make the perfect pot, steeping for just three to five minutes.  Do have two or three Swedish orange ginger snaps with your cuppa.

What do you think of these darling cups and saucers?  When I first spotted them, I immediately thought of my childhood.  They’re from British designer Cath Kidston (check out her webpage at http://www.cathkidston.com/).  While no teapot was available, I did manage to pick up the matching dessert plates.  I adore the pretty floral pattern, and the rickrack border made me think of days gone by.  So, I incorporated a quilt made from 1930s fabrics as my tablecloth.  I love the cheerful yellow!

pot1sized

Thank you for coming.  I hope you’ve enjoyed our chat.  Have you had any unusual animal encounters?  Please share them in the comment section.  I’d love to hear your stories!

endsized

scripturesizedcolored

It’s so grand,
The biggest thing to live on land!
Can use its trunk,
To smell and eat,
To rip off branches,
Taste so sweet!
A herbivore,
Eats trees and fruits,
Will not hunt meat,
But might like roots!
Flapping ears,
Like birdies wings,
Used for fans,
And hearing things!
Has a very,
Special nose,
Kind of like,
A garden’s hose…
Trunk holds water,
Like some sinks,
Sprays in mouth,
For cool, wet drinks!
And if you look,
Lined up in rows,
You see toenails,
But not its toes!
Elephants have,
Thick gray skin,
Both Asian and the African!
Two types exist,
Can walk at birth!
Biggest mammal,
Roaming Earth!
~Via Mr. R’s World of Math & Science http://sciencepoems.net/sciencepoems/elephantsbordersized2

bordersized

COPYRIGHT 2017. VICTORIA BENCHLEY ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

9 thoughts on “Tea and Elephants

  1. Great blog, Victoria! Love what your son said about the circus being like a dream. I agree with him. I know both sides of the circus animal issue – but like you – I miss and am sad that they became history. Some of the animals were loved and well treated, too. So excited about your new book!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. As a small child, my brother and I rode an elephant at the San Antonio, Texas zoo. Many years later, when our children were small and we were living in San Antonio, our daughters and I rode an elephant – again in the zoo. The same elephant? Perhaps. It was a great experience!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s